Sun Safety

Sun Safety

Information Resources

By Evelyn Cunico, MA, MS/LIS
Posted June 25, 2019

Background

Protecting your skin from sun damage throughout the year is important, no matter the weather. Why? The more time spent in the sun, the higher the risk for skin aging and skin cancer. People of all skin colors are at risk for this damage.

In 2016, the most recent year for which statistical data are available, 82,476 new cases of Melanomas of the skin were reported, and 8,188 people died of Melanomas of the skin in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Reduce Your Risk for Skin Cancer, Sunburn, and Early Skin Aging

Invisible Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes sun damage to the body. Sunburn is a type of skin damage caused by the sun.

You can reduce your risks from sun damage with the following tips.

  • Prepare for indoor activity. Stay indoors between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., when the sun’s rays are the most intense. If you are outdoors during these hours, find shade under a tree, a tent, or an umbrella.
  • Wear sun protective clothing. Protective clothing includes ankle-length pants and skirts, shirts with long sleeves and high neck lines, and clothes with tightly-woven fabric.
  • Wear a hat. Broad-brimmed hats that shade ears, face, neck, and scalp offer good protection. If your child chooses a baseball cap, be sure to protect exposed areas with sunscreen.
  • Use sunscreen. Use broad spectrum sunscreens with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) value of 15 or higher, even on cloudy days. Broad spectrum sunscreens protect against both UVA and UVB rays, two types of sun ultraviolet radiation.
  • Read sunscreen labels. Always ask a medical doctor before applying sunscreen to children younger than age six months.

Protect Your Eyes with Sunglasses

Sunlight that is reflecting off sand, snow, or water increases exposure to UV radiation and increases your risk of developing eye problems. You can protect your eyes with certain types of sunglasses.

  • Read the label on sunglasses. Choose sunglasses with a UVA/UVB rating of 100 percent, to get the most UV protection. Wear sunglasses, even if you wear contact lenses.
  • Children should wear sunglasses whose label indicates the UV protection rating of 100 percent. Toy sunglasses may not have UV protection.
  • Do not mistake dark-tinted sunglasses as having more UV protection. Many sunglasses with light-colored tints, such as amber, gray, green, or red can offer the same UV protection as very dark lenses.
  • Consider large, wrap-around-style frames. They may provide broader UV protection. Wrap-around-styles are especially important when you are on or near water, because much of the UV radiation comes from light that reflects off the water surface.
  • Be aware of misleading advertising. Understand that sunglasses that cost more do not necessarily ensure greater UV protection.

For more information about sun safety, please browse the following Selected Information Resources.

Disclaimer: The information presented in this blog should not replace the medical advice of your doctor. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any disease, illness, or other health condition without first consulting with your medical doctor or other healthcare provider.

Selected Information Resources

American Academy of Ophthalmology. The Sun, UV Radiation, and Your Eyes.
Summary Note: Focuses on tips to protect your eyes from the sun throughout the year. Includes links on Snow Blindness and How to Choose the Best Sunglasses.
(Accessed 2019 June 22).

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How Can I Protect My Children from Sun?
Summary Note: Easy-to-browse tips with colorful graphic icons. Includes links to Basic Information, Statistics, and Success Stories.
(Accessed 2019 June 22)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. United States Cancer Statistics.
Summary Note: The United States Cancer Statistics (USCS) are the official federal cancer statistics.
(Accessed 2019 June 24)

Mayo Clinic. Healthy Lifestyle. Adult Health. Best Sunscreen: Understand Sunscreen Options.
Summary Note: Mayo Clinic Dermatologist offers guidance on the best sunscreen to use. Defines SPF. Explains what to look for on sunscreen labels. Discusses sun safety for you and your children. Describes types of applications and how to apply them.
(Accessed 2019 June 22)

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. Sun Exposure. also called: Sunburn.
Summary Note: MedlinePlus Topic Page for Sun Exposure. Includes Prevention and Risk Factors, Treatments and Therapies, and Related Issues, such as Best Sunscreen. Includes sections on Children, Teenagers, Patient Handouts, and Find an Expert.
(Accessed 2019 June 22)

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. Medical Encyclopedia. Sunburn.
Summary Note: Describes symptoms of sunburn. Includes graphic illustrations.
(Accessed 2019 June 22)

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Tips to Stay Safe in the Sun: From Sunscreen to Sunglasses.
Summary Note: Tips to protect your skin from sun damage throughout the year.
(Accessed 2019 June 24)

Advertisements

Teen Smoking

Teen Smoking

Information Resources

By Evelyn Cunico, MA, MS/LIS
Posted May 25, 2019

 

Nearly All Tobacco Use Begins During Youth

Tobacco use often begins during youth and progresses during young adulthood, according to the Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health, Fact Sheet on Smoking and Youth.

The younger you are when you start smoking, the more problems it can cause. Persons who start smoking before the age of 21 have the hardest time quitting, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Tobacco Use Causes Cancer

Tobacco use causes many types of cancer, including acute myeloid (bone marrow) leukemia, as well as cancer of the bladder, cervix, colon and rectum, esophagus, kidney, larynx (voice box), liver, lung, mouth, pancreas, stomach, and throat, according to the National Cancer Institute.

The problem is not just cigarettes. Spit tobacco, that is, smokeless tobacco, and e-cigarettes, that is, electronic cigarettes, are not safe alternatives to cigarettes, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Secondhand Smoke Exposure Often Leads to Infections

Compared with children who are not exposed, children exposed to secondhand smoke suffer a greater number of ear infections, respiratory infections, asthma attacks, and missed school days, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Resources Are Available to You for How To Quit Smoking

Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States.

Most people find that a combination of resources works best. Many smokers do not quit the first time they try. But the benefits are worth it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests the following resources for quitting.

Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW
1-800-784-8669

Visit the SmokeFree dot Gov website.

For more information about tobacco use and health, and how to quit smoking, please browse the following Selected Information Resources.

Disclaimer: The information presented in this blog should not replace the medical advice of your doctor. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any disease, illness, or other health condition without first consulting with your medical doctor.

Selected Information Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking and Tobacco Use. Information Sheet. You(th) and Tobacco
Summary Note: Bulleted lists target how tobacco use affects athletic performance, personal appearance, and lung growth. Reminds athletic coaches and parents that adult lifestyle behavior influences young persons. Encourages smoke-free community events.
(Accessed 2019 May 23)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking and Tobacco Use. Tobacco-Related Mortality
Summary Note: Statistics showing tobacco use increased risk for death among men and among women.
(Accessed 2019 May 25)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Office on Smoking and Health. Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health 50th Anniversary 1964-2014. Fact Sheet on Smoking and Youth.
Summary Note: Fact Sheet on Smoking and Youth is an excerpt from the 2014 Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health.
(Accessed 2019 May 24)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Office on Smoking and Health. Surgeon General’s Report: The Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress
Summary Note: The 2014 Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark 1964 report, which was the first federal government report linking smoking and specific diseases.
(Accessed 2019 May 24)

Mayo Clinic. Healthy Lifestyle. Tween and Teen Health. Teen Smoking, Ten Ways to Keep Teens Smoke-Free
Summary Note: Suggests ten ways that parents can discourage teens from smoking. Encourages non-judgmental open discussion by asking your teens why they smoke. Includes section on health dangers of smokeless tobacco.
(Accessed 2019 May 23)

National Institutes of Health. National Cancer Institute. How to Manage Cravings
Summary Note: Learning how to manage cigarette cravings takes practice. Includes a list of things you can do, to beat the urge to smoke. Keep trying different things until you find what works for you.
(Accessed 2019 May 23)

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. E-Cigarettes. Also called: E-Cigs, Electronic Cigarettes, Personal Vaporizer.
Summary Note: MedlinePlus Topic Page on E-Cigarettes. Information resources discuss relationship between e-cigarette use and tobacco cigarette use in teens. Includes link on increase in e-cigarette use among middle and high school students. Provides link to National Institute on Drug Abuse.(Accessed 2019 May 22)

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. Medical Encyclopedia. Talking with Your Child about Smoking
Summary Note: Suggests talking openly about the fact that you do not approve of your child smoking. Offers suggestions such as, how you can help you child say no, if a friend offers a cigarette.
(Accessed 2019 May 23)

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. Smoking and Youth. Also called: Teen Smoking.
Summary Note: MedlinePlus Topic Page on Teen Smoking. Categories include Basics, Related Issues, Resources, such as Find an Expert, and Statistics and Research. Includes separate sections entitled, Children, Teenagers, and Patient Handouts.
(Accessed 2019 May 23)

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Youth and Tobacco.
Summary Note: Lists tobacco products whose sale is restricted to protect children and adolescents. Includes link to the 2018 National Youth Tobacco Survey.
(Accessed 2019 May 23)

 

 

Healthy Breakfasts for Kids

Healthy Breakfasts for Kids

Information Resources

By Evelyn Cunico, MA, MS/LIS
Posted April 24, 2019

Why Is Breakfast a Must for Your Child?

Breakfast provides your child with the energy needed to listen and to learn in school. Skipping a nutritious breakfast can leave your child hungry, tired, and looking for less healthy foods later in the day, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Library of Medicine.

What Is a Healthy Breakfast?

Breakfast does not have to mean traditional breakfast foods, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Try to maintain a healthy balance. So, if your kids would like a change from cereal and eggs, think about tuna fish with celery on a whole wheat English muffin, or a turkey sandwich from dinner left-overs.

How Can You Prepare Breakfast during a Busy Morning?

Skip the sweet rolls. The night before, prepare and refrigerate small bowls of whole grains and fruit. For example, layer plain yogurt, topped with granola, nuts, and chopped fruit, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

How Can You Learn about Food Nutrients?

Visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Nutrition Facts Label website. Look for the Nutrition Facts Label on grocery store foods. Read the Label to find out about total calories per serving.

See the Nutrition Facts Label line items for carbohydrate, cholesterol, fat, protein, and sodium. Also note the new line item for Added Sugars. Then, toward the bottom of the Label, see the amounts of nutrients, such as Calcium, Iron, Potassium, and Vitamin D.

For more information, please visit the Selected Information Resources following this CHIME blog post.

Disclaimer: The information presented in this blog should not replace the medical advice of your doctor. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any disease, illness, or other health condition without first consulting with your medical doctor.

Selected Information Resources

NIH MedlinePlus: The Magazine. A publication of the National Institutes of Health and the Friends of the National Library of Medicine. Spring-Summer 2010. Six Easy Steps Toward Healthier Eating
Summary Note: Make sure that your child eats a healthy breakfast every day.
(Accessed 2019 April 23)

U.S. Department of Agriculture. Choose My Plate dot Gov. My Plate My Wins. Healthy Eating Solutions for Everyday Life. Make Small Changes: Breakfast
Summary Note: Suggests ways you can create personalized breakfast meals through small changes in eating plans. Celebrate wins, as you and your children meet goals.
(Accessed 2019 April 19)

U.S. Department of Agriculture. Food and Nutrition Service. Team Nutrition. School Breakfast Materials
Summary Note: Offers free nutrition education materials for your School Breakfast Program activities, for children from kindergarten through middle school. Print materials also available to child care centers that participate in the USDA child nutrition programs.
(Accessed 2019 April 19)

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Changes to the Nutrition Facts Label
Summary Note: Presents a side-by-side view of Nutrition Label and What Is New, according to Final Rules published in the May 27, 2016 issue of The Federal Register.
(Accessed 2019 April 19)

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Healthy Breakfasts for Kids: It’s All about Balance.
Summary Note: Registered dietician from the Food and Drug Administration offers seven tips on how parents can help children to start their day with a healthy breakfast.
(Accessed 2019 April 19)

 

Tips to Manage Hay Fever

Tips to Manage Hay Fever

Information Resources

By Evelyn Cunico, MA, MS/LIS
Posted March 26, 2019

What Is Hay Fever?

Hay Fever is another name for Pollen Allergy. Hay Fever is called a seasonal allergy, because during spring, summer, and fall, certain grasses, trees, and weeds release tiny pollen grains into the air that you breathe. Allergies, including Hay Fever, can be inherited, so if members of your family have Hay Fever, you may experience symptoms.

What Are the Symptoms of Hay Fever?

Hay Fever can include the following symptoms:

  • Coughing and a clogged nose
  • Itching eyes, nose, and throat
  • Red and watery eyes
  • Sneezing, often with a runny nose

What Are Some Tips to Help You to Manage Hay Fever?

It is always important to make an appointment with your medical doctor, if you are experiencing what you believe to be symptoms of hay fever. Your doctor may be able to relieve your symptoms with medications and advice.

To find out whether pollen counts are high in your geographic area, listen to the local weather report on TV or the radio, or search online, using the key words, Pollen Count and then the name of your city and state.

Tips for managing allergies, asthma, and pollen are recommended in the patient instructions of the National Institutes of Health, U.S. National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia, at the entry for Allergies, Asthma, and Pollen.

The Medical Encyclopedia website content is reviewed by A.D.A.M. a credible online clinical and consumer health information library, which subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation

  • Avoid the outdoors between 5:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m.
  • Keep doors and windows closed.
  • Use an air conditioner.
  • Limit outdoor activities to late afternoon or after a heavy rain that washes away pollen.
  • Wear a protective face mask.
  • Replace grass in your yard with ground cover that does not produce much pollen, such as Irish moss.
  • If you buy trees for your yard, look for tree types that will not make your allergies worse. For example, select from the following tree types: Crape Myrtle, Dogwood, Fig, Fir, Palm, Pear, Plum, Redbud, and Redwood.

For more information, please see the Selected Information Resources that conclude this blog post.

Disclaimer: The information presented in this blog should not replace the medical advice of your doctor. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any disease, illness, or other health condition without first consulting with your medical doctor.

Selected Information Resources

American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation. Choosing Wisely. Allergy Tests: When You Need Them and When You Don’t.
Summary Note: Report developed in 2016 by Consumer Reports, in cooperation with the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, cautions that allergy tests without a doctor exam are sometimes unreliable. Advises when to consider having allergy tests.
(Accessed 2019 March 19)

American Osteopathic Association. Sorting Out Seasonal Allergies
Summary Note: Includes list of symptoms of seasonal allergies and tips on how you can avoid seasonal allergies. Explains preventive care approach of Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (DOs).
(Accessed 2019 March 19)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Health Statistics. FastStats: Allergies and Hay Fever.
Summary Note: Includes statistical data from the National Health Interview Survey, 2017.
(Accessed 2019 March 19)

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia Allergies, Asthma, and Pollen.
Summary Note: Discusses allergies as triggers to avoid. Lists actions to take when pollen levels are high. Suggests planting specific types of trees that will not make your allergies worse.
(Accessed 2019 March 25)

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. Hay Fever, also called, Pollen Allergy.
Summary Note: MedlinePlus Hay Fever Topic Page defines Hay Fever. Links to Allergy Tests, Prevention, and Treatments. Includes section focused on children.
(Accessed 2019 March 19)

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. NIH MedlinePlus. The Magazine. Spring 2015. Managing Your Seasonal Allergies.
Summary Note: Briefly discusses grass pollen, tree pollen, and weed pollen. Includes list of Fast Facts from National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
(Accessed 2019 March 19)

Nemours Foundation. KidsHealth. Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever). About Seasonal Allergies. Reviewed by Jordan C. Smallwood, M.D. October 2016.
Summary Note: Article for parents discusses how childhood seasonal allergies are diagnosed with skin tests. Links to article that explains skin testing for allergies.
(Accessed 2019 March 19)

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. For Consumers. Allergy Meds Could Affect Your Driving.
Summary Note: Article discusses precautions that you should take when using medications for allergy relief, especially when driving. Cautions against use of alcohol, sleep medications, or tranquilizers, while taking antihistamines.
(Accessed 2019 March 19)

 

 

 

 

How to Increase Positive Emotions

How to Increase Positive Emotions

Information Resources

By Evelyn Cunico, MA, MS/LIS
Posted February 22, 2019

The Power of Positive Emotions

Many articles and books have been written about the power of positive thinking. More recently, medical researchers have been studying the power of positive emotions.

Studies have found that when persons are attentive to their positive emotions, they can take steps to increase them, which over time leads to an overall feeling of happiness and well-being.

How to Increase Five Positive Emotions

Acceptance: Practice acceptance when talking with persons. Acceptance can mean listening with interest without trying to change the opinions of others. Acceptance builds mutual respect.

Cheerfulness: Develop a cheerful personal approach. Cheerfulness and good-natured laughter instill hope for yourself and others. When you make cheerfulness a habit, your mind builds resilience to adjust to an ever-changing world.

Compassion: Look for ways to show compassion. You might open a door for someone, or invite someone to step ahead of you in a long waiting line, or you might focus on smiling at people you meet.

Gratitude: Begin each day with gratitude. You might be grateful for a friend, or a pet, or a personal accomplishment, or sunshine streaming through your window. Experiencing gratitude sets the stage for your daily activities.

Peacefulness: Create a peaceful environment. You might find peace in nature by looking up into the night sky. Or you may experience peacefulness by meditating or by enjoying classical music.

Take Action

Everyone has the power to increase their positive emotions. Increasing your positive emotions requires personal action. When increasing your positive emotions becomes a habit, you will build self-esteem, which, in itself, is a positive emotion. Begin to take action now.

Disclaimer: The information presented in this blog should not replace the medical advice of your doctor. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any disease, illness, or other health condition without first consulting with your medical doctor or other healthcare provider.

Selected Information Resources

Mayo Clinic. News Network. How to Train a Happy Brain. Posted by Dana Sparks, January 19, 2015.
Summary Note: Animated video titled, A Very Happy Brain, by Amit Sood, M.D., M.Sc., Director of Research, Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, Mayo Clinic. Illustrates how practicing daily Gratitude and Compassion can defeat Fear and Self-Doubt. Conveys message that the pursuit of Gratitude and Compassion will make you happier than the Pursuit of Happiness.
(Accessed 2019 Feb 20)

Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Healthy Lifestyle. Stress Management. Positive Thinking: Stop Negative Self-Talk to Reduce Stress
Summary Note: Provides examples for understanding positive thinking and self-talk. Includes list of health benefits of positive thinking. Suggests how to put positive thinking into practice.
(Accessed 2019 Jan 26)

Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. A Worksite Wellness Intervention: Improving Happiness, Life Satisfaction, and Gratitude in Health Care Workers. Mayo Clinic Proceedings: Innovations, Quality, and Outcomes. 2017 Dec; 1(3): 203-210.
Summary Note: Stress Management and Resiliency Training (SMART) program among health care workers improved happiness, satisfaction with life, gratitude, spirituality, and stress management.
(Accessed 2019 Feb 20)

National Institutes of Health. NIH News in Health. A monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. January 2019. Dr. Maria Kovacs on Mood and Depression
Summary Note: A conversation with a professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Pittsburgh offers practical suggestions for getting out of a bad mood.
(Accessed 2019 Jan 26)

Nemours Foundation. KidsHealth for Teens. Positive Emotions: A Worksheet. Reviewed by D’Arcy Lyness, Ph.D.
Summary Note: Worksheet helps teenagers to explore ten positive emotions. Goal is to promote teen self-awareness and self-determined action.
(Accessed 2019 Feb 20)

Nemours Foundation. KidsHealth for Teens. The Power of Positive Emotions. Reviewed by Mary L. Gavin, M.D.
Summary Note: Discusses how positive emotions affect our brains by increasing attention, awareness, and memory. Provides examples of daily actions that can increase positive emotions.
(Accessed 2019 Feb 20)

 

 

Physical Activity Guidelines Updated to Include Preschool Children

Physical Activity Guidelines Updated to Include Preschool Children

Information Resources

By Evelyn Cunico, MA, MS/LIS
Posted January 09, 2019

Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, Second Edition, 2018, which was released in November 2018, provides updated science-based guidance to help persons aged three years and older to improve their health through participation in regular physical activity, according to the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The updated edition reflects new knowledge gained since the publication of the first Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, released in 2008.

Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, Second Edition, 2018 is meant to be used with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015 to 2020. Together, the two documents offer guidance on the importance of being physically active and eating a healthy diet.

Achieving the benefits of physical activity depends on your own personal efforts to increase physical activity for yourself and your family and friends, according to the updated Guidelines. Action is also required locally in your community, school, and workplace.

Key Guidelines

  • Preschool children, that is, children aged three through five years, should be physically active throughout the day to enhance growth and development.
  • Adult caregivers of preschool children should encourage active play that includes a variety of activity types.
  • Adults are no longer required to exercise in sessions of at least ten minutes. Even five minutes of physical activity provide health benefits.

To view additional Key Guidelines, see the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Second Edition, 2018. Executive Summary

Move Your Way Campaign

The primary audiences of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans are health professionals and policy makers.

The Move Your Way Campaign was created by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion to offer consumer tips on how you can put the Guidelines into action.

For Move Your Way resources, including fact sheets, graphics, interactive tools, and videos to help you, browse the Move Your Way Campaign website.

Disclaimer: The information presented in this blog should not replace the medical advice of your doctor. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any disease, illness, or other health condition without first consulting with your medical doctor or other healthcare provider.

Selected Information Resources

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. How Much Activity Do You Need? NIH News in Health. January 2019 issue.
Summary Note: Updated advice about physical activity goals is based on the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, Second Edition, 2018.
(Accessed 2019 Jan 07)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP). About page
Summary Note: Describes education and training activities, programs, and services. Includes links to three health information websites managed by ODPHP: health dot gov, healthfinder dot gov, and HealthyPeople dot gov.
(Accessed 2019 Jan 03)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015 to 2020, Eighth Edition. Executive Summary
Summary Note: Public law requires that every five years the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) jointly publish a report containing nutritional and dietary information and guidelines for the general public. Dietary Guidelines for Americans provides guidance on eating a healthy diet to reduce the risk of chronic disease and promote good health.
(Accessed 2019 Jan 04)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Home page
Summary Note: Subject links include Food and Nutrition, Health Care Quality, Health Literacy, and Physical Activity.
(Accessed 2019 Jan 03)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. News and Events. News blog. November 12, 2018. Updated Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Now Available
Summary Note: Announces the Second Edition of Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2018.
(Accessed 2019 Jan 03)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Second Edition, 2018. Executive Summary.
Summary Note: Discusses the proven benefits of physical activity, based on knowledge gained since publication of the first Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, released in 2008. Includes new aspects, such as discussion of guidance for preschool children, aged three through five years.
(Accessed 2019 Jan 03)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Move Your Way.
Summary Note: Describes campaign called, Move Your Way, which provides tips on how to meet the recommendations of the Physical Activity Guidelines.
(Accessed 2019 Jan 03)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Move Your Way. Get More Information about Physical Activity
Summary Note: Physical Activity resources for persons who have specific health conditions.
(Accessed 2019 Jan 03)

 

 

 

DASH Eating Plan Drives Healthy Lifestyle

DASH Eating Plan Drives Healthy Lifestyle

Information Resources

By Evelyn Cunico, MA, MS/LIS
Posted December 19, 2018

What is the DASH Eating Plan?

DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The DASH Eating Plan is also called, the DASH diet. The DASH Eating Plan was developed by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), a research institute in the National Institutes of Health.

The DASH Eating Plan is designed to lower your blood pressure without medicine. However, anyone can benefit from the DASH Eating Plan, according to the NHLBI.

What foods does the DASH Eating Plan recommend?

DASH emphasizes eating a variety of foods, limiting portion sizes (that is, the amount that you choose to eat), and getting the right amount of nutrients.

The DASH Eating Plan suggests changing eating and drinking habits.

  • Emphasize fruits, vegetables, and whole-grains.
  • Include fish, poultry, beans, nuts, and vegetable oils.
  • Use fat-free or low-fat dairy products.
  • Think of red meat as a side dish, instead of a main course.
  • Limit the portion size of sweet desserts.
  • Limit alcohol to two drinks a day for a man, or one drink a day for a woman.
  • Limit sodium.

Does the DASH Eating Plan follow the Dietary Guidelines for Americans?

The DASH Eating Plan follows the Key Recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015-2020.

For example, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend limiting sodium intake. Diets high in sodium are associated with an increased risk of developing high blood pressure, according to the Guidelines.

DASH Eating Plan foods are naturally low in sodium. You can reduce your sodium even more by training yourself to read food labels. Then, buy foods that are labeled, No Salt Added, or Low-Sodium.

Instead of salt, use herbs. Basil, oregano, and rosemary are a few examples of herbs that add flavor to foods. If you gradually switch from salt to herbs, your taste over several weeks will adjust to the new flavors.

In addition to lowering blood pressure, the DASH Eating Plan can help to prevent cancer, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, and stroke, according to the NHLBI.

Disclaimer: The information presented in this blog should not replace the medical advice of your doctor. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any disease, illness, or other health condition without first consulting with your medical doctor or other healthcare provider.

Selected Information Resources

Cunico, Evelyn. CHIME Consumer Health: Consumer Health Information Made Easy. Nutrition Facts Label Changes to Include Added Sugars. CHIME blog Archive May 2016
Summary Note: CHIME Consumer Health blog article, in May 2016 Archive, discusses the Nutrition Facts label, updated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
(Accessed 2018 December 19)

Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Healthy Lifestyle. Nutrition and Healthy Eating. DASH Diet: Healthy Eating to Lower Your Blood Pressure.
Summary Note: Provides examples of the recommended servings from each food group for the 2,000 calorie-a-day DASH diet.
(Accessed 2018 December 17)

National Institutes of Health. NIH News in Health. December 2018. Plan Your Plate. Shifting to a Healthy Eating Style.
Summary Note: NIH newsletter discusses the DASH diet as an eating plan for anyone who would like to improve their lifestyle eating habits.
(Accessed 2018 December 17)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Executive Summary: Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015-2020.
Summary Note: Summarizes The Guidelines and Key Recommendations that encourage healthy eating patterns.
(Accessed 2018 December 18)

U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. DASH Eating Plan.
Summary Note: MedlinePlus topic page for the DASH Eating Plan also called: DASH Diet.
(Accessed 2018 December 17)

U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. Understanding the DASH Diet.
Summary Note: Medical Encyclopedia explains how the DASH diet works to help you to eat nutritious foods. Discusses Health Benefits and Possible Health Concerns.
(Accessed 2018 December 17)