Eight Children’s Health Resources

Eight Children’s Health Resources

By Evelyn Cunico, M.A., M.S.

Posted May 27, 2014

In the 21st century, children’s health is a responsibility shared by healthcare providers, parents, other caregivers, children, themselves, and government and volunteer organizations.

Everyone’s education should include learning about health, because physical, mental, and social well-being helps people to enjoy life and to succeed in achieving their goals.

Following is a select list of children’s health resources. The resources provide reliable, up-to-date, easy-to-read, free printable information about conditions, diseases, and wellness issues. Most offer subscription email updates. Some offer a mobile version.

MedlinePlus: Children’s Health
MedlinePlus, produced by the National Library of Medicine, is the National Institutes of Health (NIH) website for patients and their families. The Children’s Health web pages of MedlinePlus include an A to Z list of Children’s Health Topics, as well as links to general Health Topics, Drugs and Supplements, and Videos. The website also includes links to Patient Handouts and online articles from MedlinePlus Magazine.

MedlinePlus: Languages: Children’s Health
MedlinePlus offers children’s health information by topic in select languages.

Consumer Updates: Children’s Health
Consumer Updates: Children’s Health is a website of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). FDA is responsible for protecting the public health by ensuring the safety of our nation’s food supply and human and veterinary drugs. FDA Children’s Health focuses on topic updates such as, nutrition practices, child and teen tobacco use prevention, and safety of children’s medical devices, medications, and treatments.

Family Health. Parents: ABCs of Raising Safe and Healthy Kids
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is one of the major components of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The CDC Family Health website offers an A to Z list of titles, to find steps for keeping kids safe and healthy. In addition, the Family Health website has links for teens and college students and related CDC links, including a parent portal.

KidsHealth
KidsHealth offers general health information for and about children and teens from The Nemours Center for Children’s Health Media, part of The Nemours Foundation, a nonprofit organization with ongoing medical reviews by pediatricians and other medical experts. According to its website, KidsHealth partners with corporations, foundations, and other groups that help to fund KidsHealth educational programs for families.

EatPlayGrow: Creative Activities for a Healthy Start
EatPlayGrow is a health education program created by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Children’s Museum of Manhattan (CMOM). The EatPlayGrow curriculum teaches children aged two to five years and their parents and caregivers how to make healthy nutrition, physical activity, and restful sleep choices. The program was adapted from the We Can! NIH program for children aged eight to 13 years [see below, We Can!]. Lessons include interactive art-making, storytelling, music, movement, and food portion size activities. Materials for EatPlayGrow and We Can! are free.

We Can!
We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children’s Activity and Nutrition) is a national science-based education curriculum designed to teach parents, caregivers, and the community ways to help children aged eight to 13 years stay at a healthy weight. Four National Institutes of Health collaborate in We Can!: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Insurance: Children’s Health: CHIP
The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) provides free or low-cost health coverage for more than seven million children up to age 19, whose families meet low-income requirements. Each state designs its own CHIP program, including eligibility, benefits, premiums and cost-sharing, and application and renewal procedures.

 References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CDC Office of Women’s Health. Family Health. Parents: ABCs of Raising Safe and Healthy Kids.
(Accessed 26 May 2014)

Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
(Accessed 09 May 2014)

Department of Health and Human Services. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Consumer Updates: Children’s Health.
(Accessed 09 May 2014)

 National Institutes of Health. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. EatPlayGrow: Creative Activities for a Healthy Start.
(Accessed 26 May 2014)

National Institutes of Health. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. We Can!
(Accessed 26 May 2014)

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus: Children’s Health.
(Accessed 08 May 2014)

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus: Languages: Children’s Health.
(Accessed 26 May 2014)

The Nemours Foundation. The Nemours Center for Children’s Health Media. KidsHealth.
(Accessed 04 May 2014)

A disclaimer: The information presented in this blog should not replace the medical advice of your physician. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any disease without first consulting with your physician or other healthcare provider.