Vaccinations for Your Children

Vaccinations for Your Children

Information Resources

By Evelyn Cunico, MA, MSLIS

Posted September 30, 2015

 

Why Vaccines Are Important for Your Children

More than a million people each day travel to and from other countries, where many vaccine-preventable diseases are still common, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). At the CDC website, “Vaccine-Preventable Childhood Diseases,” the CDC cautions, “without vaccines, epidemics of many preventable diseases could return, resulting in increased — and unnecessary — illness, disability, and death among children.”

Protect Your Children

Although vaccination rates are high in the United States, there is no way to know if everyone your child comes into contact with has been vaccinated. The CDC website warns that many viruses and bacteria are still circulating in this country, or are only a plane ride away. That is why it is important that children, especially infants and young children, receive recommended immunizations on time.

If you are concerned about the safety of immunizations, see The Nemours Foundation KidsHealth website, with “Frequently Asked Questions about Immunizations ,” written in plain language. Then, make an appointment with your doctor, to talk about immunizations for your children.

Disclaimer: The information presented in this blog should not replace the medical advice of your doctor. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any disease, illness, or other health condition without first consulting with your medical doctor or other healthcare provider.

Information Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Children, the Flu, and the Flu Vaccine .” Cautions that children should be vaccinated every flu season. Discusses how to protect your children from the flu, lists available flu vaccines for children, and provides special vaccination instructions.
(Accessed 29 September 2015)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Immunization Schedules for Infants and Children in Easy-to-read Formats.”
(Accessed 30 September 2015).

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Immunization Schedules for Preteens and Teens in Easy-to-read-Formats.”
(Accessed 30 September 2015)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Vaccine-Preventable Childhood Diseases .” Descriptions of vaccine-preventable childhood diseases, with links to print-friendly fact sheets, flyers, and posters.
(Accessed 11 September 2015)

Hill, H.A., Elam-Evans, L.D., Yankey, D., Singleton, J.A., and Kolasa, M. “National, State, and Selected Local Area Vaccination Coverage among Children Aged 19-35 Months – United States, 2014.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). 2015 August 28; 64(33):889-96. Vaccination coverage estimates and analysis from the National Immunization Survey (NIS).
(Abstract accessed 09 September 2015).

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. “Childhood Immunization .” Extensive information in numerous languages, with a helpful “Start Here” list of information resources.
(Accessed 07 September 2015)

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia . “Vaccines (immunizations) – Overview.” How vaccines work, purpose and safety of vaccines, and list of common immunizations.
(Accessed 08 September 2015)

The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. “Frequently Asked Questions about Immunizations .” Answers in plain language to common questions about immunizations, from one of the largest resources online for medically reviewed health information written for parents, kids, and teens.
(Accessed 11 September 2015)

Seither, R., Calhoun, K., Knighton, C.L., Mellerson, J., Meador, S., Tippins, A., Greby, S.M., and Dietz, V. “Vaccination Coverage among Children in Kindergarten – United States, 2014-15 School Year.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). 2015 August 28; 64(33):897-904. Describes vaccination coverage estimates in 49 states and the District of Columbia.
(Abstract accessed 09 September 2015)

Weiner, J.L., Fisher, A.M., Nowak, G.J., Basket, M.M., and Gellin, B.G. “Childhood Immunizations: First-Time Expectant Mothers ‘ Knowledge, Beliefs, Intentions, and Behaviors.” American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2015 August 18. How first-time mothers decide with respect to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended childhood immunization schedules.
(Abstract accessed 09 September 2015)

 

 

 

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