Tips on Selecting a Complementary Health Practitioner

Tips on Selecting a Complementary Health Practitioner

Information Resources

By Evelyn Cunico, MA, MS/LIS
Posted April 25, 2017

Background

More than 30 percent of adults and about 12 percent of children use complementary health care approaches, according to the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for 2012.

However, there is evidence that persons who use complementary health approaches often do not discuss their use with their medical doctors. Instead, persons often rely on other sources, including family and friends, practitioners of complementary health approaches, the Internet, popular magazines, and advertising.

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), which is the Federal Government lead agency for scientific research on complementary health approaches, reminds you that, if you are considering going to a complementary health practitioner, you should tell your medical doctor and other health care providers.

Talking with all of your health care providers will help you to select a complementary health practitioner that is appropriate for your specific medical condition.

Selecting a Complementary Health Practitioner

NCCIH has published a fact sheet titled, Six Things to Know When Selecting a Complementary Health Practitioner

One of the six things in the fact sheet is: Tell all of your health care providers (for example, medical doctor, registered dietitian, pharmacist) about all of the complementary approaches you use.

The reason that you need to tell all of your health care providers about your complementary care is that health conditions can affect the safety of complementary approaches. For example, if you have glaucoma, some yoga poses may not be safe for you.

Keeping your health care providers fully informed helps you to stay in control and to manage your health.

For more information, see the Selected Information Resources at the end of this blog post.

Disclaimer: The information presented in this blog should not replace the medical advice of your medical doctor. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any disease, illness, or other health condition without first consulting with your medical doctor.

Selected Information Resources

National Institutes of Health. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Complementary, Alternative, or Integrative Health: What’s in a Name?
Summary Note: Fact sheet defines terms. Bar graph shows the ten most common complementary health approaches among adults, based on the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).
(Accessed 17 April 2017)

National Institutes of Health. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Credentialing, Licensing, and Education
Summary Note: Fact sheet provides an overview of the credentialing of practitioners. One section gives examples of how Licensing Requirements for Complementary Health Practitioners vary from state to state and different practices.
(Accessed 17 April 2017)

National Institutes of Health. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Four Tips: Start Talking with Your Health Care Providers about Complementary Health Approaches
Summary Note: Tips on how you can begin a conversation with your health care provider about complementary health approaches.
(Accessed 17 April 2017)

National Institutes of Health. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Six Things to Know When Selecting a Complementary Health Practitioner
Summary Note: Tips help to guide your search for a complementary health practitioner.
(Accessed 17 April 2017)

National Institutes of Health. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Tips on Complementary Health Practices
Summary Note: Tips help you to understand a therapy’s potential benefits, risks, and scientific evidence, so that you can make informed decisions about health care approaches that are best for your own medical condition.
(Accessed 17 April 2017)

National Institutes of Health. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for 2012. Use of Complementary Health Approaches in the U.S.
Summary Note: Highlights key facts about the use of Natural Products and Mind and Body Approaches by American adults and children. One section includes NHIS findings about consumer spending and insurance for complementary health approaches.
(Accessed 24 April 2017)

 

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