Create an Active Lifestyle

Create an Active Lifestyle

Information Resources

By Evelyn Cunico, MA, MS/LIS
Posted January 19, 2018

What is an Active Lifestyle?

An active lifestyle includes at least 30 minutes of brisk walking or other moderate activity, five days a week, according to the National Institutes of Health.

However, most adults nationwide do not meet this 30-minute minimum daily recommended amount of physical activity.

Why Do Many Adults Choose Not to Adopt an Active Lifestyle?

Lack of time is a common reason for not exercising, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

How Can You Learn to Choose Active Lifestyle Activities?

The CDC recommends identifying available time slots by paying attention to your daily routine for one week. Identify at least three 30-minute time slots in a week that you could use for physical activity.

Select activities that require minimal time, such as, jogging, stair climbing, or walking.

How Can You Be More Active at Home?

MedlinePlus, which is part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine, suggests some ways that you can be active at home.

  • Do housework, gardening, and yard work, which are all physical work.
  • Walk your kids to school, walk your dog, or go for a walk in your neighborhood.
  • Keep moving while you watch TV. Do some yoga stretches or lift hand weights.
  • Get some exercise equipment, such as exercise mats or stretch bands.

How Can You Be More Active at Work?

  • At least once each hour, get up from your desk chair and move around.
  • Take the stairs, instead of the elevator.
  • Use your break or part of your lunch time to walk around the building.
  • Have “walking” meetings with co-workers, instead of sitting in a conference room.
  • Stand when you are talking on the phone.

Experts on physical activity and nutrition say that it is not necessary to do vigorous physical activity, such as running, to have beneficial health effects.

Just 30 minutes of brisk walking most days, in at least 10-minute segments, can have a healthy effect.

Most important, you have to learn to look for opportunities to fit physical activity into your days, according to the National Institutes of Health. You can put on your sneakers and go to the gym, but that is not the only way to get active.

Create an active lifestyle by getting active, wherever you are!

For more ideas on how to get active physically, browse the following Selected Information Resources.

Disclaimer: The information presented in this blog should not replace the medical advice of your doctor. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any disease, illness, or other health condition without first consulting with your medical doctor.

Selected Information Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Overcoming Barriers to Physical Activity.
Summary Note: Lists the ten most common reasons that American adults give when asked why they are not more physically active. Offers Suggestions for Overcoming Physical Activity Barriers.
(Accessed 12 January 2018)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Physical Activity and Health. The Benefits of Physical Activity.
Summary Note: Lists benefits of physical activity, such as controlling your weight and reducing your risk of cardiovascular disease. Focus is that everyone can gain the health benefits of physical activity. Age, ethnicity, and body shape do not matter.
(Accessed 16 January 2018)

Cunico, Evelyn. CHIME Consumer Health. Physical Activity – How to Start. Information Resources. Blog posted June 28, 2016.
Summary Note: Suggests that believing in your ability to be active physically, combined with social support from family and friends, can lead to a healthier, more active lifestyle. Selected Information Resources include links to authoritative websites, such as, the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the Nemours Foundation.
(Accessed 12 January 2018)

Cunico, Evelyn. CHIME Consumer Health. Walking for Health and Fun. Information Resources. Blog posted January 31, 2015.
Summary Note: Discusses walking as the most popular form of physical activity in the U.S. Lists health benefits and community projects that encourage walking. Selected Information Resources include links to 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans and authoritative medical journal articles on recreational neighborhood walking.
(Accessed 12 January 2018)

National Institutes of Health. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Home page.
Summary Note: The NHLB Institute provides research, training, and education to prevent and treat heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. The NHLB Institute is also the primary NIH organization for research on Health Risks of an Inactive Lifestyle.
(Accessed 12 January 2018)

National Institutes of Health. May 2015. Opportunities Abound for Moving Around: Get Active, Wherever You Are.
Summary Note: A monthly newsletter from NIH, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The May 2015 issue offers ideas on how to become more active in everyday healthful physical activities without spending a lot of money. Sidebar includes Links and References.
(Accessed 06 January 2018)

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. Health Risks of an Inactive Lifestyle.
Summary Note: Defines inactive lifestyle. Describes how an inactive lifestyle affects your body, including disease risks. Suggests ways to get started with exercise at home and at work. Includes Resources, Clinical Trials, and Journal Articles.
(Accessed 06 January 2018)

Saelens, Brian E., Anne Vernez Moudon, Bumjoon Kang, Philip M. Hurvitz, and Chuan Zhou. American Public Health Association, American Journal of Public Health. 2014 May; 104(5):854-859. Relation between Higher Physical Activity and Public Transit Use
Summary Note: Public transit use data collected in 2008 to 2009 from nearly 700 Travel Assessment and Community study participants from King County, Washington State showed that transit use was directly related to higher physical activity.
(Free PMC Full Text accessed 12 January 2018)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans
Summary Note: Provides science-based guidance to help Americans ages six and older to maintain or to improve their health through regular physical activity. View Guidelines by category, such as, Children and Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults, Women during Pregnancy, Adults with Disabilities, and People with Medical Conditions.
(Accessed 15 January 2018)

 

 

 

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